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Virtual Doctor Pain Description Blueprint

Get this valuable patient engagement resource for pain evaluation now!  Help your doctor diagnose and treat your pain.

 😛 

 

patient engagementVirtual Doctor Pain Description Blueprint is a tool for patients to describe and record their pain prior to visits to a doctor.  Its purpose is to improve the evaluation of pain.  As such it is a vital resource for patient engagement in the pain assessment process.

If questions posed by your doctor have stumped you in the past, you can relate to the anxiety and shame that the lack of preparedness can cause during a visit with a doctor. Thinking of key questions prior to the visit can prevent this problem though.  It can also help you answer many questions more accurately.  In turn, it can result in more precise and timely diagnoses and treatment.
The resultant improved efficiency and productivity of the visits can also reduce costs.  One reason is the less amount of time that has to be spent obtaining vital information.  The other is decreased reliance on tests.  After all, studies have shown that an accurate history leads to a correct diagnosis of more medical conditions and more often than does reliance on testing.

Virtual Doctor Pain Description Blueprint is composed of digital forms for each bodily area where pain commonly patient engagementoccurs.  Those areas are the chest, abdomen (belly), head, neck, back, joints and limbs (extremities). Each form has questions and easy instructions on how to record the answers. The forms are for use with a computer. But they can be printed and filled out manually.

The scheme and sequence of the questions is according to the PQRST pneumonic that doctors and nurses often use to diagnose the cause of pain.

The P column of the form pertains to the factors which provoke (bring on) or palliate (relieve) the pain.

The Q column is for describing the quality of the pain with an adjective(s) and specifying any other associated symptoms.

The R column captures the region of the pain and whether or not it radiates.  Radiation of pain means it remains where it began but also extends into another area(s) through adjacent connection points.

The S column is for grading the severity of the pain on a scale of 1+ – 10+.  The pain rating consists of two numbers.  The low number is when it is least severe.  The high number is when it is most severe.

The T column is for the recording of information about the pain in relationship to time.  Time variables include when the pain started; how long it lasts; and how frequently it occurs.

The intended use of this resource is by patients.  But with the proper license, doctors and others in the healthcare field can use it for evaluating patients.  Settings where it might be used include but are not limited to the following:

  • A patient’s home
  • A doctor’s waiting room
  • A doctor’s examination room
  • A hospital
  • An urgent care center
  • A telemedicine care center

patient engagementLimited or absent computer skills and varying degrees of cognitive impairment might be obstacles to the use of this resource by some people.  But a good work around is a loved one or other caregiver who can ask the questions and enter the data. 

Moreover, patients with dementia are more likely to answer questions correctly with repetition of the questions over several days by someone they know.  The answers also tend to be more reliable when the questioning is in a familiar setting.

Depending on patient and doctor preference, the recorded information can serve as one or more of the following:

  • A patient reference source for answering questions during a doctor visit
  • A record for the doctor to review during a patient visit
  • A record for the doctor to review prior to a patient visit after receiving it via an electronic health record (EHR) portal, fax, e-mail, or regular mail

This resource is not a substitute for medical evaluation, and its use does not constitute the establishment of a doctor patient relationship with its developer.  If you have unexplained pain you should not self-diagnose.  You should see a licensed physician.

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Get this valuable patient engagement resource for pain evaluation now!  Help your doctor diagnose and treat your pain.

 😛 

 

Updated: November 16, 2017 — 3:11 pm
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